Scottish bagpipes pin from Scotland


Scottish bagpipes pin from Scotland

This pin from Scotland, small thought it may be, depicts a symbol closely linked with Scotland. Bagpipes are a class of musical instrument, aerophones, using enclosed reeds fed from a constant reservoir of air in the form of a bag. Though the Scottish Great Highland Bagpipe and Irish uilleann pipes have the greatest international visibility, bagpipes have been played for centuries throughout large parts of Europe, the Caucasus, around the Persian Gulf and in Northern Africa. The term “bagpipe” is equally correct in the singular or plural, although in English, pipers most commonly talk of “the pipes” or “a set of pipes”.

The evidence for Roman and pre-Roman era bagpipes is still uncertain but several textual and visual clues have been suggested. The Oxford History of Music says that a sculpture of bagpipes has been found on a Hittite slab at Euyuk in the Middle East, dated to 1000 BC. A Hebrew word in the Biblical book of Daniel (3:5) is translated as “bagpipe” in some English versions (e.g. NASB). In the 2nd century AD, Suetonius described the Roman Emperor Nero as a player of the tibia utricularis. Dio Chrysostom wrote in the 1st century of a contemporary sovereign (possibly Nero) who could play a pipe (tibia, Roman reedpipes similar to Greek aulos) with his mouth as well as with his “armpit”.

Location: 02-C2

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