Pin from St. Louis showing the arch

Pin from St. Louis showing the arch

I grew up (ages 10-19) in Western Kentucky. Radio dominated my entertainment, and especially listening to Harry Carrey broadcast the St. Louis Cardinals’[1] games. I remember the heroes: Stan Musial, Enos Slaughter, Red Schoendiest, and so many others. When I was a grad student in Kansas, I went around St. Louis every trip between Lawrence, Kansas and Murray, my home town. I never really visited St. Louis until I was teaching for Southern Illinois University and we had a meeting in the city. I got to go to a Cards game, and it happened to be Old Timers’ day. I met Enos there briefly. I walked by the statue of Stan the Man, in his infamous batting crouch. St. Louis is a major United States port on the eastern line of the state of Missouri, the 58th-largest U.S. city in 2012. The city of St. Louis was founded in 1764 by Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau, and named for Louis IX of France, the only canonized King of France. After the Louisiana Purchase, it became a major port on the Mississippi River. Its population expanded after the American Civil War, and it became the fourth-largest city in the United States in the late 19th century. It seceded from St. Louis County in March 1877, allowing it to become an independent city and limiting its political boundaries. In 1904, it hosted the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and the 1904 Summer Olympics. The city’s population peaked in 1950, then began a long decline that continues in the 21st century. Immigration has increased, and it is the center of the largest Bosnian population in the world outside their homeland. The city is commonly identified with the Gateway Arch, part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in downtown St. Louis.

Location: 13-A2


[1] See St. Louis Cardinals blog

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