Pin from Traquair House, visited in 2010

Pin from Traquair House, visited in 2010

This pin was acquired at the Traquair House. The name Traquair comes from tret or tre a word of Celtic origin meaning a dwelling place or hamlet, and from quair meaning a stream with a winding course. The Quair burn joins the River Tweed a few hundred yards from the rear of the house.

It is not know when the exact foundations of the house were laid but a substantial structure must have existed by 1107 when Alexander I of Scotland signed a royal charter at Traquair. At this time the castle was used as a hunting lodge for royalty and also as a base where they could administer justice, issue laws and hold courts. At Traquair, many charters still exist. One, signed in 1175 authorized William the Lion to found a Bishop’s Burgh with a right to hold a market on Thursday. This small hamlet was later to become the City of Glasgow.

See more about this house at http://www.traquair.co.uk/brief-history-traquair-and-family

Traquair House, the oldest inhabited house in Scotland, dates back to 1107 AD, when it was a hunting lodge for the kings of Scotland. It has had descendants of the same family living in it from 1491 to the present day. As did many estates of the era, Traquair operated a house brewery and when Mary Queen of Scots visited in 1566, Traquair was already brewing a famous strong ale.

Some time after 1800, brewing ceased at Traquair. The original brewery equipment remained on the estate, idle, until the 20th Laird of Traquair, Peter Maxwell Stuart, discovered the recipe and restored the brewery in 1965. The copper brewkettle at Traquair is over 200 years old, and beer is made in the traditional manner — even using oak fermenting vessels, which contribute to the deep, unique character of these beers.

Contemporary view of Traquair House

Contemporary view of Traquair House

Location: 02-E3

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