White Jersey for Tour de France

White Jersey for Tour de France

In the Tour de France, there has been an official competition for young riders since 1975. Excluding the years 1989 to 1999, the leader of the young rider classification wore a white jersey. The requirements to be eligible for the young rider classification have changed over the years but have always been such that experienced cyclists were not eligible, sometimes by excluding cyclists over a certain age, cyclists who had entered the Tour de France before, or cyclists who had been professional for more than two years. In the most recent years, only cyclists below 26 years are eligible.

From 1968 to 1975, there was a white jersey awarded in the Tour de France to the lead rider in the combination classification (best rider in the overall, points and climbing competitions). In 1975, this classification was removed, and replaced by the Best Young Rider Classification. Any neo-professional (less than three years professional) competed in this classification, which was calculated using the rankings for the General Classification. The leader in the young rider classification wore a white jersey.

The rules for the young rider classification changed in 1983, when the competition was only open for first-time competitors, but in 1987 it became open for all cyclists less than 26 years of age at 1 January of the year following that tour. From 1989-1999, the white jersey was no longer awarded, although the competition was still calculated. Since 2000, the white jersey has again been awarded, open for all cyclists less than 26 years of age at 1 January of the year following that Tour. In 1997, the name of the competition officially changed to Souvenir Fabio Casartelli. Czech auto manufacturer Škoda has sponsored the white jersey ever since it took over the auto sponsorship of the Tour de France from FIAT in 2003.

Location: 15-A6

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