Swiss Army knife tie pin version

Swiss Army knife tie pin version

I have a few versions of The Swiss Army knife (German: Schweizer Offiziersmesser: “Swiss officer’s knife”, Swiss-German: Sackmesser) is a brand of pocket knife or multi-tool manufactured by Victorinox AG (and Wenger SA). The term “Swiss Army knife” was coined by US soldiers after World War II due to the difficulty they had in pronouncing the German name.

The Swiss Army knife generally has a sharp blade, as well as various tools, such as screwdrivers, a can opener, and many others. These attachments are stowed inside the handle of the knife through a pivot point mechanism. The handle is usually red, and features a Victorinox or Wenger “cross” logo or, for Swiss military issue knives, the coat of arms of Switzerland.

During the late 1880s, the Swiss Army decided to purchase a new folding pocket knife for their soldiers. This knife was to be suitable for use by the army in opening canned food and disassembling the Swiss service rifle, which required a screwdriver for assembly.

In January 1891, the knife received the official designation Modell 1890. The knife had a blade, reamer, can-opener, screwdriver, and grips made out of dark oak wood that was later partly replaced with ebony wood. At that time no Swiss company had the necessary production capacity, so the initial order for 15,000 knives was placed with the German knife manufacturer Wester & Co. from Solingen, Germany. These knives were delivered in October 1891.

In 1891, Karl Elsener, then owner of a company that made surgical equipment, set out to manufacture the knives in Switzerland itself. At the end of 1891 Elsener took over production of the Modell 1890 knives, but Elsener was not satisfied with its first incarnation. In 1896, Elsener succeeded in attaching tools on both sides of the handle using a special spring mechanism: this allowed him to use the same spring to hold them in place, an innovation at the time. This allowed Elsener to put twice as many features on the knife. On 12 June 1897 this knife featuring a second smaller cutting blade, corkscrew, and wood fiber grips was originally registered with the patent office as The Officer’s and Sports Knife, though it was never part of a military contract.

The design of the knife and its versatility have both led to worldwide recognition.

Why does it have a corkscrew? Well, you would know if you ever had to open a bottle of Chablis under fire.

Location: 04-G3

Advertisements