The German Corner where Rhein meets Main

The German Corner where Rhein meets Main

This pin I got in Koblenz while visiting there on May 21, 2014. It shows the “German Corner”.

Really this should be Koblenz and the German Corner (Deutsches Eck). Here the Rhein and Moselle meet.

Koblenz is a city in the Middle Rhine Valley in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in the Federal Republic of Germany.

Deutsches Eck. This spot (the name means German Corner in German) is where the Mosel River meets the Rhein River. The tip of the park is shaped like a ship’s prow, overlooked by an enormous equestrian statue of Kaiser Wilhelm mounted on an equally-huge stone base that you can climb for a great view of the rivers and opposite shore castle/fort. Not far from the German Corner, you can catch a little sightseeing train which will drive around and point out some of the interesting things about Koblenz.

Festung Ehrenbreitstein (Ehrenbreitstein Fortress in Koblenz) – This is a big military castle/fort in good condition. From there you have a good view over Koblenz (entry fee about €6). There is also a museum located on the other side of the Rhine.

 

View of Koblenz from the Rhein

View of Koblenz from the Rhein

Militär Museum. This is a big military museum. It is located on the other side of the Mosel. In the past Koblenz was an important strategic military area. On every side of the rivers were military castles/forts. Rivers were the most important logistic routes until the 20th century. Their possession could decide who won or lost a war.

The point at Koblenz where the Rhein and Main meet

The point at Koblenz where the Rhein and Main meet

 

 

Monument to William I of Germany

Monument to William I of Germany

William I Monument

The Teutonic Knights were given an area for their Deutschherrenhaus Balley right at the confluence of the Rhine and Mosel, which became known as German Corner (Deutsches Eck).

In 1897, a monument to German Emperor William I of Germany, mounted on a 14 meter high horse, was inaugurated there by his grandson William II. The architect was Bruno Schmitz, who was responsible for a number of nationalistic German monuments and memorials. The German Corner is since associated with this monument, the (re) foundation of the German Empire and the German refusal of any French claims to the area, as described in the song “Die Wacht am Rhein” together with the “Wacht am Rhein” called “Niederwalddenkmal” some 30 kilometres (19 miles) upstream.

During World War II, the statue was destroyed by US artillery. The French occupation administration intended the complete destruction of the monument and wanted to replace it with a new one.

In 1953, Bundespräsident Theodor Heuss re-dedicated the monument to German unity, adding the signs of the remaining western federal states as well as the ones of the lost areas in the East. A Flag of Germany waved there since. The Saarland was added four years later after the population had voted to join Germany.

In the 1980s, a movie of the monument was often shown on late night TV when the National Anthem was played to mark the end of the day, a practice which was discontinued when nonstop broadcasting became common. On 3 October 1990, the very day the former GDR states joined, their signs were added to the monument.

As German unity was considered complete and the areas under Polish administration were ceded to Poland, the monument lost its official active purpose, now only reminding of history. In 1993, the flag was replaced by a copy of the statue, donated by a local couple. The day chosen for the reinstatement of the statue, however, caused controversy as it coincided with Sedantag (Sedan Day) (2 September 1870) a day of celebration remembering Germany’s victory over France in the Battle of Sedan. The event was widely celebrated from the 1870s until the start of the 20th century.

Location: 19-D2

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