Estonian Flag

Estonian Flag pin

Estonian Flag pin

I got this (and several others as well) pin in Tallinn, Estonia on May 17, 2015. I was so impressed with Estonia. The tours I took showed me that the people love their independence, love music, and have done an excellent job at governing themselves.

 

Estonia is a country in the Baltic region (specifically off the Gulf of Finland) of Northern Europe. It is bordered to the north by the Gulf of Finland, to the west by the Baltic Sea, to the south by Latvia, and to the east by Lake Peipus and Russia. Across the Baltic Sea lies Sweden in the west and Finland in the north. The territory of Estonia consists of a mainland and over 1500 islands and islets in the Baltic Sea, covering 17,462 sq mi of land, and is influenced by a humid continental climate.

Estonia is a democratic parliamentary republic divided into fifteen counties, with its capital and largest city being Tallinn. With a population of 1.3 million, it is one of the

Timeline of Estonian rule

Timeline of Estonian rule

least-populous member states of the European Union, Eurozone, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Schengen Area. The Estonians are a Finnic people, and the official language, Estonian, is a Finno-Ugric language closely related to Finnish and the Sami languages, and distantly to Hungarian.

A developed country with an advanced, high-income economy and high living standards, Estonia ranks very high in the Human Development Index, and performs favorably in measurements of economic freedom, civil liberties, education, and press freedom (third in the world in 2012). Estonia is often described as one of the most wired countries in Europe.

Estonia declared independence in Pärnu on 23 February in 1918. Following the Bolshevik takeover of power in Russia after the October Revolution of 1917 and German victories against the Russian army, between the Russian Red Army’s retreat and the arrival of advancing German troops, the Committee of Elders of the Maapäev issued the Estonian Declaration of Independence in Pärnu on 23 February and in Tallinn on 24 February 1918.

After winning the Estonian War of Independence against both Soviet Russia and the German Freikorps and Baltische Landeswehr volunteers, the Tartu Peace Treaty was signed on 2 February 1920. The Republic of Estonia was recognized by Finland on 7 July 1920, Poland on 31 December 1920, Argentina on 12 January 1921, by the Western Allies on 26 January 1921 and by India on 22 September 1921.

Estonia maintained its independence for twenty-two years. Initially a parliamentary democracy, the parliament was disbanded in 1934, following political unrest caused by the global economic crisis. Subsequently, the country was ruled by decree by Konstantin Päts, who became president in 1938, the year parliamentary elections resumed.

The U.S., UK, France, Italy and the majority of other Western countries considered the annexation of Estonia by the USSR illegal. They retained diplomatic relations with the representatives of the independent Republic of Estonia, never recognized the existence of the Estonian SSR, and never recognized Estonia as a legal constituent part of the Soviet Union. Estonia’s return to independence became possible as the Soviet Union faced internal regime challenges, loosening its hold on the outer empire. As the 1980s progressed, a movement for Estonian autonomy started. In the initial period of 1987–1989, this was partially for more economic independence, but as the Soviet Union weakened and it became increasingly obvious that nothing short of full independence would do, Estonia began a course towards self-determination.

Estonia joined the European Union in 2004 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.

In 1989, during the “Singing Revolution”, in a landmark demonstration for more independence, more than two million people formed a human chain stretching through Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, called the Baltic Way. All three nations had similar experiences of occupation and similar aspirations for regaining independence. The Estonian Sovereignty Declaration was issued on 16 November 1988. On 20 August 1991, Estonia declared formal independence during the Soviet military coup attempt in Moscow, reconstituting the pre-1940 state. The Soviet Union recognized the independence of Estonia on 6 September 1991. The first country to diplomatically recognize Estonia’s reclaimed independence was Iceland. The last units of the Russian army left on 31 August 1994.

Estonia joined NATO on 29 March 2004.[92]

The 2004 enlargement of the European Union was the largest single expansion of the European Union, both in terms of territory and population, but not in terms of gross domestic product (wealth). Estonia was among a group of ten countries admitted to the EU on 1 May 2004. The Treaty of Accession 2003 was signed on 16 April 2003.

Location: 15-D4

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